Program

Oral
OR28-72-5

Virtue, Continence, Incontinence and Vice: Making Virtue Judgments Based on the Judgment of Thinking Systems

[Speaker] Yu, Feng:1
[Co-author] Kaiping, Peng:1
1:Tsinghua University (China (People's Republic of China))

Virtue ethics has been attacked by Situationism recently. The debate centers around the question whether, as with personality traits, virtues can predict moral behavior. We proposed a new theory of personality which integrates personality structures such as traits with personality dynamics such as thinking processes. Six experiments using scenarios and mouse-tracking methods were done to explore the relationship of thinking systems and virtue judgments. All the experiments found that, at the level of folk psychology, agents who behaved morally using system 1 thinking were recognized as most virtuous, followed by those who behaved morally using system 2 thinking; while agents who behaved immorally using system 1 thinking were recognized as least virtuous, followed by those who behaved immorally using system 2 thinking. The results are consistent with Aristotle's hierarchical classification of virtue, which consists of virtue, continence, incontinence, and vice. The results have broad normative and educational implications.
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