Program

Poster
PS25P-11-95

Trait self-esteem does not moderate the effect of mortality salience on cultural worldview defense and fear in Japan: Cultural differences between Europe and Asia.

[Speaker] Toya, Akihiro:1
[Co-author] Nakashima, Kenichiro:1, Morinaga, Yasuko:1
1:Hiroshima University (Japan)

According to terror management theory (Greenberg et al., 1986), cultural worldview and self-esteem buffer death anxiety. Previous studies found that mortality salience (MS) manipulation produces cultural worldview defense (e.g., Arndt et al., 1997), and elevates fear (Lambert et al., 2014). Furthermore, high self-esteem reduces the effect of MS manipulation (Harman-Jones et al., 1997). We conducted three studies to examine whether self-esteem moderates the effect of MS manipulation on worldview defense and fear in Japan. Self-esteem was assessed using the Japanese version of Rosenberg's self-esteem scale (Yamamoto et al., 1982). We obtained main three results: (a) MS manipulation elevated fear, (b) MS manipulation did not influence cultural worldview defense, and (c) self-esteem did not moderate the effect of MS manipulation. We discussed these results in terms of cultural differences between Europe and Asia.
Advanced Search